Why is Inclusion and Accessibility Important?

accessOne of my job responsibilities at the Museum is to ensure accessibility for all visitors, regardless of their medical conditions or abilities. We work toward this goal in a number of ways at Boston Children’s Museum, most notably through our Morningstar Access program in which visitors with any special needs or medical needs can have a quieter, safer visit to the Museum during set hours. Although this program is often highlighted and is great for those whose main concern is the crowds that visit the Museum at peak times, we put every effort into making the Museum environment, exhibits, and programs more accessible for everyone at all times. If certain needs are not addressed by design, then with advance notice, reasonable accommodations can always be made anytime the museum is open.

When we talk about accessibility and why it’s important, one of the common arguments is that accessibility isn’t just for people with disabilities. Everyone benefits from easier and various ways to access information, materials, and/or environments  But let me try to add a different spin on why I think accessibility is important. Continue reading

Sing Ho! A Silly Old Bear Turns 90

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When I was One,

I had just begun.

When I was Two,

I was nearly new.

When I was Three,

I was hardly Me.

When I was Four,

I was not much more.

When I was Five,

I was just alive.

But now I am Six, I’m as clever as clever.

So I think I’ll be six now and for ever and ever.[1]

This October, one of the most beloved bears of all time turns 90 years old. Though he appears in earlier publications, fans prefer to celebrate the birth of Winnie-the-Pooh on October 14 as that is the date Winnie-the-Pooh was published.

To join in the festivities, here are a few things you may or may not know about a silly old bear. Continue reading

Put Your Listening Ears On!

canon-1-aug-83When my older son was four, he begged for Goodnight, Goodnight Construction Site at bedtime.

When he was five, it was Magic Treehouse.

But now that he’s six and just started first grade, he can read to himself, and there is a new treat he begs for…a science podcast for kids.  Yes, BEGS!  To the point that we have had to negotiate an allowance of two podcasts per week so that we’re still reading most nights.

A little background: I grew up on a farm in the landlocked Midwest and had vivid dreams of marine biology and ocean exploration.  I devoured all books on the subject that I could get my hands on (that list was short).  Now I’m raising kids in a world where we can watch (and have watched!) a documentary about giant squid tracking anytime we want.  A YouTube video of open heart surgery.  An app about human anatomy, or insect identification.  A live cam on the otters at the Monterey Bay Aquarium.  An animation of primate evolution or chemical bonding.  Suffice to say this would’ve blown my 6-year-old mind.  The access to science and all its wonders is…limitless. Continue reading

Sharing and Caring: Ramadan Themes in Action

Ramadan 2016 1Can you go without food or water from dawn to sunset? This is exactly what many Muslim adults do during Ramadan. More importantly, Muslims try to experience what the less fortunate go through every day and practice good habits and deeds, such as giving more to charity and practicing self-control. Fasting is usually broken with water, dates or milk before the start of the evening meal, called iftar.

Ramadan began on Sunday, June 5th and came to an end on Tuesday, July 5th, 2016. The next day, on Wednesday, July 6th many children and families woke up to Eid Al Fitr (feast of breaking the fast) to put on their finest clothes and many girls around the world washed their hands to reveal the beautiful design dyed with henna. On the morning of Eid, many people go to the mosque for prayer, as well as visiting friends and families. Continue reading

Eleanor’s Adventures in Wonderland

Two summers ago, I went “down the rabbit hole” of dollhouse furniture in the Museum’s collection (https://bostonchildrensmuseum.wordpress.com/2014/06/10/down-the-rabbit-hole/) With hundreds of pieces of previously uncatalogued dollhouse furnishings, one of my interns finally picked up where I left off. Read more about her adventures in here with Boston Children’s Museum collections…

IMG_7593My seven year old self would be extremely jealous of the position I’m currently in. For the past few months I’ve been helping digitize records of Boston Children’s Museum’s dollhouse furniture collection as the Growdon Collections Intern. Growing up an avid doll-lover, memories of playing with my own dollhouse are some of my strongest; and one of my favorite places to go – and drag my unwilling family to – was an independent doll and dollhouse store. Getting the chance to dive headfirst into the endless drawers of miniatures at Boston Children’s Museum is literally my childhood dream!

It’s my last day as Growdon Intern and as I look back fondly on my time here, I’m astounded at how much I’ve learned. It’s hard to appreciate the work the Collections team does when visiting Boston Children’s Museum for a short time, with 24 window displays, and special programs only showing a small percentage of the range of over 50,000 objects! Continue reading

More Than a Mess

IMG_1645“We have fabric, hula hoops, flagging tape, little drink umbrellas, string, some scissors, chalk, and cardboard tubes. What else do we need? What’s missing?”

“There are more cardboard tubes upstairs. Let’s bring out some duct tape. I think we might need more fabric…Oh this material has a cool texture! And look at these mirrors!”

This is a typical conversation I have every Monday morning here at Boston Children’s Museum. My Mondays are dedicated to making a mess. Each Messy Monday a team of Museum staff from the Art Studio and the Messy Sensory area in Playspace team up to support hands-on activities for children and adults of all ages. This could mean anything from painting with spaghetti to mixing shaving cream and sand to create moldable dough. This past Monday our invitation to our visitors was, “Come in and do whatever you want with the materials we have here.” It is increasingly rare for children today to be given this kind of open invitation and it is always interesting to see what happens next. Continue reading

Happy Birthday, Beatrix!

BCM Pirated Peter Rabbit 003This July marks the 150th anniversary of the birth of renowned children’s author, illustrator, and conservationist, Beatrix Potter. Her tales played an important role in the shift that took place for children’s literature in the 20th century. Publishers recognized the importance of children as an audience and the need for higher quality in their offerings. Potter’s first and perhaps most famous tale is The Tale of Peter Rabbit published in 1902. In celebration of the sesquicentennial, here are some interesting facts about Beatrix Potter and Peter Rabbit. Continue reading

We Stand with You

Today we awoke to the horrible news of another mass shooting, the most deadly in American history. In the assault on a nightclub in Orlando, Florida, 49 innocent people were killed and over 50 wounded in an attack on a popular LGBTQ club celebrating both Pride Month and the Latino community.

Boston Children’s Museum is a place of joy and learning for all families, many of whom are members of the diverse communities of Boston and the Commonwealth. An attack on the LGBTQ and Latino communities is an attack on all of us, and we grieve for the families of those who senselessly lost their lives.

It was just three years ago that Boston suffered its own terror attack with the loss of three lives and the injury of many others. At that time, we arose as Boston Strong – the slogan that helped us come together and heal. But, just three years later, we see our community under duress, as hate crimes against the African American, Muslim, Jewish, Latino, LGBTQ and other minority communities persist. At the same time, Boston saw the senseless death of a young student, Raekwon Brown, at Jeremiah Burke High School in Dorchester last week. This promising junior lost his life in an attack just steps from the school.

As parents, teachers and citizens, how do we make sense of these heinous acts and how do we explain them to our children and students? How do we manage our outrage, our fear, and our confusion? I would like to suggest we channel these feelings of helplessness into action. Young children are learning at a fast rate and absorbing all that they see and hear. They also have an acute sense of what is right and wrong. During these critical impressionable years, we need to teach our children to understand differences, to recognize bias and hate, to learn to accept those different from themselves, and to stand up against bullies. We need to set them on a path that will lead to the development of healthy relationships, respect and compassion for those different than themselves, and a strong sense of community and citizenship. At the same time, we must also look deep into ourselves and uncover our own unconscious biases, addressing them in an open and transparent way, with humility and an eagerness to change our own behaviors and beliefs, so that we can stand against intolerance and bigotry.

At Boston Children’s Museum, we work hard to create community through our many cultural festivals, our MorningStar programs for kids with special needs, our Boston Black exhibit, our access programs and our outreach to Boston’s diverse communities. In the next few years we will increase our focus on teaching tolerance and combating bias and bullying. Below I have shared some resources that may help you to teach tolerance to your children and students.

In the wake of this past week’s terrible events, and those that came before, we pledge that Boston Children’s Museum will remain a place of peace and community, where all families are welcome to enjoy their time together in our rich, learning environment. We stand by the communities that have come under attack and we will stand by you in your efforts to raise healthy, happy children who will grow to become great citizens of our country and our world.

Resources for Teaching Tolerance:

Beyond the Golden Rule, a Teaching Tolerance Publication:

http://www.tolerance.org/sites/default/files/general/beyond_golden_rule.pdf

Anti-Defamation League, Anti-Bias Study Guides:

http://www.adl.org/education-outreach/curriculum-resources/c/anti-bias-study-guides.html#.V14a9FeFXzI

Anti-Bias Education, National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC):

https://www.naeyc.org/content/anti-bias-guide-holidays

 

Carole Charnow 6/12/16

The Makers are Coming! The Makers are Coming!

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Have you heard the news? In July, Boston Children’s Museum is hosting Boston’s first official Maker Faire! What is a Maker Faire, you ask? Great question. Part science fair, part county fair, and part something entirely new, Maker Faire is an all-ages gathering of creative doers – tech enthusiasts, designers, robot builders, artists, tinkerers, hobbyists, engineers, authors, crafters, students, commercial exhibitors, and more. All of these “makers” come to Maker Faire to show what they create with their bare hands and bold minds, and to share how they do it, why they do it, and what they learn. And visitors get in on the making as well. Maker Faires are community-based learning events that inspire everyone to think creatively and innovatively, and to connect with people and projects in their local community.

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There have been over 150 Maker Faires around the world since 2005. New York, San Mateo, Detroit, Kansas City, Atlanta, Milwaukee, Orlando, San Diego, Washington DC, Ottawa, Lisbon, Paris, Rome, Berlin, Hanover, Oslo, Trondheim, Seoul, Singapore, Taipei, Tokyo, Shenzhen, and over 120 other cities and towns have hosted Maker Faires. And now you can add Boston to that list.

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Want to see a 3D printer in action? Join us at the Boston Mini Maker Faire. Want to meet R2D2 and BB8? They’ll be at the Boston Mini Maker Faire. Want to see a Japanese woodworker do his thing? Or create your own spin art? Or fold and paint a paper birdhouse that you get to keep? Or try some LEGO engineering? Or see a robot dance? Well…you know what to do. Join us at the Boston Mini Maker Faire!

The details:
When: Saturday, July 23, 2016, 10 am-5pm
Where: Boston Children’s Museum
308 Congress Street, Boston, MA, 02210.

Tickets are on sale now! Click here to purchase.

For More Information, Visit:

https://makerfaireboston.com/

To contact us, please write:
info (AT) makerfaireboston (DOT) com.

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Boston Mini Maker Faire is a kind of marketplace of possibilities, where both children AND adults will be exposed to the amazing, the ingenious, and the captivating; where you can shop around for creative endeavors you may not have thought possible. Children will find that future self they can aspire to, whether it be an artist, engineer, hobbyist or world-changing inventor of marvelous things. Adults will find inspiration to spark their own creativity. And parents will see their kids in a new light, as they try, test, and stretch their minds in new and exciting directions. And most of all – it will be a whole lot of fun. We hope you will join us! Pre-event tickets are on sale now – click the link above, or visit the event website to get your tickets before the event is sold out. See you at the Faire!

Encouraging Kindness

milk bottle 2bThis month’s blog post is written by Boston Children’s Museum’s Health and Wellness intern, Marissa Veilleux. She is a graduate student from Wheelock College pursuing a degree in Child Life. Marissa is helping provide various health programs in the Museum, and she is passionate about helping our visitors learn about caring about themselves and others.

This semester I had the opportunity to design and run this year’s “Message in a Milk Bottle” project entitled Be Kind, Spread Love. I traveled to local area hospitals and schools where we created heart-shaped suncatchers and discussed love and kindness, and then transported these beautiful suncatchers to Boston Children’s Museum and hung in a window for all to see.
Visitors then had the opportunity to create their own suncatchers and add to them to this display, creating a united window of suncatcher hearts.

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But kindness cannot be taught in one day. There are many opportunities in your day to day life where you can teach kindness to your child, especially by modeling it for them every day.

Children are constantly told to be nice to others. But what does that really mean? Here are four ways to teach your child kindness during your daily tasks.

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Let’s work together.

Ask children for help with projects, like cooking in the kitchen. Ask them what they would like to do to help. When taking a walk, suggest that they pick flowers to give to someone to brighten their day. This can be used as an opportunity to talk about kindness. You can work as a team to do things like cleaning up toys. You can say, “You pick up three and I will pick up three”. Follow that with, “You picked up your toy. Thank you. That was helpful.”

Use your manners.

Walk the walk, and talk the talk. Model good behavior by saying please and thank you or no thank you to the cashier at the grocery store or to a server at a restaurant. Children learn through others. You can praise your child’s kindness by describing your child’s action and stating how their contribution benefited others. For example, “Thank you for giving your sister a toy. That was thoughtful.”

Use kind words and smile.

It is important for your children to learn to compliment people by using kind words. You can say things to your own child like, “I love the red blocks you used to make that house.” as a way of giving them an example of a compliment that they might share with their friends. You can also ask your child what they like about something. For example, “What is your favorite part of this picture you colored? My favorite part is the blue clouds.” This will teach your child a nice way of paying compliments. Smile and laugh with your child. Happiness and kindness is contagious.

It’s not just about being kind to people.

Teach respect for the earth by discussing environmental kindness, such as throwing trash in the garbage and not littering. Have your child collect cans from home and bring them to recycle at your local supermarket. Being kind to our environment in turn teaches your children to be kind to others too.

Join us for Tasty Tuesday on 1st and 3rd Tuesdays with your snacks and share your ideas of how we can help children learn kindness!